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You are the one preparing the soil by your openness, your willingness, your joyful-giving attitude, and, above all, your heart and your being intentioned toward God.
— John-Roger, DSS

Thursday, April 30, 2009

Enough

It's understanding that lifts the consciousness.
It's not saying understanding;
it is living understanding,
it is doing understanding,
it is where, in the midst of misery,
you still have understanding.

People say, "But I'm confused. I don't understand."
I say, "That's your concern."
For you must still keep breathing,
even if you're confused,
and you must still eat,
even if you don't understand,
for no one will do these things for you.

Oh, you might get a slave for a while,
but even slaves eventually say,
"When do I get mine?"
And the master always answers, "Later."
And so the slave revolts.
But if the slave is smart, it just evolves.
For at that point of evolution,
you find out that the one who has served you
has been your god,
and the one who has understood you
has been your light,
and the one who walks with you
has been the Beloved.
And you never had to go anywhere.

(From: The Tao of Spirit by John-Roger, DSS)

*

I have had two examples in the last week of people (not on MSIA staff) coming to me with not feeling they have enough. They had a good paying job, and were healthy, and one even had a great relationship yet they sought more. I advised one today, (unsolicited--there are still too many times where I need to keep my mouth shut!) to learn to enjoy where they were. Then they would have a new skill that they could apply to anywhere they went. They smiled--unknowingly.

*

Seth Godin's post below is about business but it resonated with my thoughts above:

Infinity--they keep making more of it

If you had a little business in a little town, there was a natural limit to your growth. You hit a limit on strangers (no people left to pitch), some became friends, some became customers and you then went delivered as much as you could to this core audience. Every day wasn't spent trying to get bigger.

There's no limit now. No limit to how many clicks, readers, followers and friends you can acquire.

I don't think this new mindset is better. It shortchanges the customers you have now (screw them, if they can't take a joke, we'll just replace them!) and worse, it means you're never done. Instead of getting better, you focus obsessively on getting bigger.

You're at a conference, talking to someone who matters to you. Over their shoulder, you see a new, bigger, better networking possibility. So you scamper away. It's about getting bigger.

Compared to what? You're never going to be the biggest, so it seems like being better is a reasonable alternative.

The problem with getting bigger is that getting bigger costs you. Not just in time and money, but in focus and standards and principles. Moving your way to the biggest part of the curve means appealing to an ever broader audience, becoming (by definition) more average.

More, more, more is rarely the mantra of a successful person.

There are certainly some businesses and some projects that don't work unless they're huge, but in your case, I'm not sure that's true. Big enough is big enough, biggest isn't necessary.

Posted by Paul Kaye at 7:44 PM
Keywords: Gratitude, Happiness, Tao of Spirit, Unconditional, Values
Comments [2] | Leave Your Comment

Thursday, April 9, 2009

A Moment of Tao

Have you ever smelled perfume from a flower?
That's similar to how the Spirit moves.
That flower was really nearby in order for you to smell it.

And if you turned toward that essence of perfume and started tracing it back,
you came to the source it was coming from.
But you must pursue it in order to get to the source.

If the perfume seems to float interminably through the air, you have more of a job.
You have to be more alert, more aware,
more watchful than before.

And it could be that you smelled it for so long,
you've lost track that it's present.
But someone new coming in will say,
"That sure smells like roses,"
to once again refresh your mind of what you know.



(From The Tao of Spirit by John-Roger, DSS)

*

To strike his target, the Zen archer must be conscious yet not self-conscious. He must become one with the bow, take aim without aiming, and let the arrow release itself. Even after all that, it will be a miracle if he doesn’t put someone’s eye out. This raises the question “Why shoot bows and arrows in the first place?” The Middle Ages are over. You should find a nice sport, like tennis.


(From Zen Judaism by David M. Bader)

Posted by Paul Kaye at 8:21 PM
Keywords: Humor, Tao of Spirit
Comments [3] | Leave Your Comment

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